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ADRIANO VINCENTI & PAOLO BANDERA - OSSIDO DI CROMO (Anamnesi Mediatica Ricostruttiva) CD

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Brands Steinklang Industries
Product Code: SK157
Availability: 21
14.00€

RELEASE DATE: December 30, 2022.

Comes as 6-panels glossy laminated digipak with 24 (!) pages booklet w/ linear notes from artists, history of "industrial / experimental tapes scene in Italy" and more.
Limited edition of 150 copies.

Adriano Vincenti - known from: Macelleria Mobile Di Mezzanotte, Cronaca Nera, L'Amara, Pain Injection and many more ...
Paolo Bandera - known from: Iugula-Thor, Sigillum S and more ...

some credits from release, there is to much for putting just in 2-3 sentences ...

Electronics and Samples by Adriano Vincenti and Paolo L. Bandera.
Operational Coordination and Proposal Implementation by Adriano Vincenti.
Framework Conceptualization and Structural Assemblage by Paolo L. Bandera.
Recorded and assembled in 2022, unless otherwise detailed in additional credits.
Visuals provided by artists.
Edited by Adriano Vincenti .
Artwork Sirena Velena.
Texts by Paolo L. Bandera, Adriano Vincenti, Vittore Baroni and Maurizio Bianchi.

Additional Credits and Track Reference.

1. Track featuring unreleased material by Daniele Ciullini, recorded in 2022.
2. Track featuring unreleased material by Maurizio Bianchi, recorded in 2021.
3. Track inspired by Liutenaunt Murnau, sampling his work from 1984-1986.
4. Track inspired by Metadrive.
5. Track inspired by Observation Clinique.
6. Track inspired by Enrico Piva / Amok.
7. Track featuring Massimo Toniutti, using material taken from an unreleased version of “Enfisematosi”, second track on side A of the cassette “Putrefaction and Catharsis”, recorded in 1984.
8. Track featuring Like Wake, using material taken from the self-titled album “The Noise of Dream” released in 1988 as double C90 for Aseptic Noise.
9. Track inspired by Sacher-Pelz’s early tape works from 1979-1980.
10. Track inspired by Pier Paolo Zoppo’s “Necrosi Statica” tape, released in 1984 and recorded between 1979 and 1980.
11. Track featuring Laxative Souls, using material taken from two unreleased tracks, one with original recordings from 1984, new interventions from 2012-2023 and some additions / manipulations in 2021, the other registered in 1980-1984 and manipulated in 2021.
12. Tribute track to Unknown Artist.

CHROMIUM BI-OXIDE, A LAVISH TASTE OF EXCITING PARTICLES:
FROM YOUR EARS TO YOUR EYES TO YOUR MOUTH TO YOUR SKIN.
 

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PRESS RELEASE:

You can’t speak of industrial music without mentioning the cassette tape. The tape was an essential format in the formative years of the experimental, industrial underground, and has remained a significant factor within the post-industrial scenes ever since. Where right now the cassette tape is going through some kind of fetishized hipster-revival in other scenes, in industrial, experimental and noise music it never died.


The tape was a revolutionary format for Paolo Bandera as well, who captured his first musical experiments on tape during the early 80’s. He would go on to create pioneering works of extreme electronics with Sigillum S, embracing new technology as it became available. But never forgetting his love for the tape format: “the elaborate pleasure of manually working on recording cassettes and preparing exquisite packaging has never disappeared for me.”


This album is a tribute to that mighty format. On the initiative on Adriano Vincenti (Macelleria Mobile di Mezzanotte etc.), the two have created a homage that unites a more modern medium and technology with the traditional methodology and technology of cassette tapes. In the truest traditions of the industrial underground, the album borrows, cannibalises and adapts material from others – for example Maurizio Bianchi and Metadrive – to create experimental sounds all their own. The history of the industrial underground is heavily present in the source material: the oldest recordings are from the mid-80’s.

The result? An album of experimental, challenging and even adventurous industrial electronics. Dubbing this noise or power electronics or any other of the many subgenres of industrial is impossible: there is a little bit of everything on Ossido Di Cromo. Ultimately, the album can be described as a throwback to an era before industrial electronics had fragmented to dozens of smaller niches; this is experimental underground electronics as its purest and finest.


A fitting tribute to a format and the ways of working so intricately tied to it.




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